•  9-12th Grade Curriculum

     
     
     
     
     
    Course Title: Applied English  Department: English & Language Arts/Special Education- Life Skills
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS  
    Grade Level: 9th-12th  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes/ everyday  Length of Course: All Year

    Primary Resources: 

    Unique Curriculum, Reading A to Z, Readtopia



    Units of Study:  Recognizing the link between communication and literacy; maintaining high expectations for students to acquire literacy; making literacy materials and activities accessible to individual needs; following the interest of the child; engaging the student in direct and systematic instruction in the areas of: grammar/mechanics, comprehension, fluency, and writing.

    Curriculum Based Assessments: Curriculum based measurements - writing, comprehension checks, fluency passages

    Standardized Assessments: PASA

    Description: 

    Students are presented with reading material on their instructional levels and assessed based on their IEP goals. With the use of the Unique Curriculum, information is accessible and individualized to student areas within the topics of:

    • Life Science/ Geography
    • Scientific Inquiry
    • Earth and Space Science
    • History
    • Economics
    • Government
    • Learning About Self
    • Feelings/ Self Regulation
    • Social and Emotional
    • Health

    Monthly thematic features are presented to showcase current events within the Unique Curriculum. Students will interact with these thematic topics to incorporate a variety of content areas that are applied in real world situations. Activities focus on the reader’s comprehension of text along with lessons to reinforce daily life skills (ie. manners, following rules, and emotions).


    The Reading A to Z resource provides students with material on their individual instructional levels in leveled books that align to the Pennsylvania core standards that include informational text, comprehension skills, and project based learning. The embedded skills focus on phonics, fluency, high frequency words through the leveled books.


     
     ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: English 9  Department: English & Language Arts
     
    Grade Level: 9  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes per day/every day  Length of Course: Year

    Primary Resources: Collections 2017, Grade 9. Houghton Mifflin School, 2015.  School Board Approved Novels 
     
    Units of Study: (1) Summer Reading: Allegory & Lord of the Flies (Golding), (2) The Epic Hero & The Odyssey (Homer), (3) Short Stories (Fiction & Nonfiction), (4) Shakespeare & The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet (5) Navigating Digital Research (The Research Paper), (6) The Novel (Fiction) & To Kill a Mockingbird (Lee, (7) Understanding Poetry

    Curriculum-Based Assessments: Weekly Quizzes, Unit Tests, Individual & Collaborative, Projects, Formal & Informal Writing Assignments, Essays, Midterm & Final Examination

    Standardized Assessments: CDT Benchmark Testing, Literature Keystone Exam
     
    Description: At the ninth-grade level, students will apply knowledge of word origins, derivations, and figurative language to extend vocabulary development in authentic texts. They will be introduced to literary works from a variety of cultures and eras, and they will apply knowledge of literary terms and forms to their reading and writing and to analyses of literature and other printed materials. Students will continue to develop their reading comprehension skills through utilizing strategies to identify formats, text structures, and main ideas. They will apply these skills across the content areas, including history and social science, science, and mathematics. When selecting texts, teachers will consider appropriateness of subject and theme as well as text complexity. Students will write narrative, expository, and persuasive forms with an emphasis on analysis. As in every grade, daily writing experiences are essential for all ninth-grade students, and they will demonstrate their understanding through written products. They will develop as writers by participating in a process for writing, including prewriting, organizing, composing, revising, editing, and publishing. Students will edit writings for correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraphing.
     


    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: Honors English 9   Department: English & Language Arts

    Grade Level: 9  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes per day/every day  Length of Course: Year

    Primary Resources: Collections 2017, Grade 9. Houghton Mifflin School, 2015.  School Board Approved Novels 
     
    Units of Study: Unit 1: Comprehending and Analyzing Literature Through the Novel, Unit 2: Comprehending and Analyzing Literature Through the Epic Poem, Unit 3: Comprehending and Analyzing Literature Through Drama, Unit 4: Formal Writing, Unit 5: Comprehending and Analyzing Literature Through The Short Story and Nonfiction, Unit 6: Keystone Literature Exam Preparation, Unit 7: Fiction and Nonfiction Comprehension and Analysis

    Curriculum-Based Assessments: Comprehension Quizzes, Unit Exams, Constructed Response In-Class Writing, Literary Analysis Essays - Timed and Process Writing, Daily In-Class Activities focused on Learning Goals, Grammar Quizzes, Midterm Exam, Final Exam

    Standardized Assessments: Literature Keystone Exam

    Description: This course provides students with opportunities for continued development in the four components of English communication – reading, writing, listening, and speaking—in order to prepare them for future advanced study, to review and introduce content and skills necessary for the Keystone State Examination in Literature, and to help students become independent learners.  As an advanced genre study of literature, this course will expose students to texts from a variety of cultures and literary periods while introducing and reinforcing knowledge of literary devices and authorial craft.

    Students learn how to develop critical arguments about literature including drama, the novel, short stories and short selections of nonfiction, including analysis of the author’s use of literary elements such as plot, character, setting and theme.  Literary units will integrate study of elevated vocabulary from the literature and literary terms. The writing emphasis will include literary analysis, timed writings, reflection/response, and constructed response paragraphs. The student will be expected to correctly use and evaluate grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and style in the context of their own writing. All students completing a ninth grade English course are required to take the end of course Keystone Literature Exam, which is not calculated in the student’s final course grade.



     
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: Language Arts 9  Department: English & Language Arts

    Grade Level: 9  Time Per Day/Week: 84 minutes/day  Length of Course: Year

    Primary Resources: Collections 2017, Grade 9. Houghton Mifflin School, 2015. Green, Jane Fell. Language! 4th ed., Voyager Sopris, 2009. 
     
    Units of Study: Units of study will include Genre Studies, The Epic Hero & The Odyssey (Homer), Short Stories (Fiction & Nonfiction), Shakespeare & The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, Navigating Digital Research (The Research Paper), The Novel (Fiction) & To Kill a Mockingbird (Lee), Understanding Poetry, Language! Units 25-30

    Curriculum-Based Assessments: Weekly Quizzes, Unit Tests, Individual & Collaborative Projects, Formal & Informal Writing Assignments, Essays, Midterm & Final Examination

    Standardized Assessments: CDT Benchmark Testing

    Description: Language Arts is a course that combines research-based literacy instruction with the English 9 curriculum. At the ninth-grade level, students will apply knowledge of word origins, derivations, and figurative language to extend vocabulary development in authentic texts. They will be introduced to literary works from a variety of cultures and eras, and they will apply knowledge of literary terms and forms to their reading and writing and to analyses of literature and other printed materials. Students will continue to develop their reading comprehension skills through utilizing strategies to identify formats, text structures, and main ideas. They will apply these skills across the content areas, including history and social science, science, and mathematics. When selecting texts, teachers will consider the appropriateness of subject and theme as well as text complexity.

    Students will write narrative, expository, and persuasive forms with an emphasis on analysis. As in every grade, daily writing experiences are essential for all ninth-grade students, and they will demonstrate their understanding through written products. They will develop as writers by participating in a process for writing, including prewriting, organizing, composing, revising, editing, and publishing. Students will edit writings for correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraph.
     

     
     
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: English 10  Department: English & Language Arts
     
     
    Grade Level: 10  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes per day/every day  Length of Course: Year
     
    Primary Resources: O'Connor, J. Regis. Speech: Exploring Communications. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1988. Print.  Strunk, Wm., and E.B. White. The Elements of Style. New York: Pearson Longman, 2009. Print.  Sebranek, Patrick, and Dave Kemper. Writers Inc.: Sourcebook: Student Writing Guidelines, Models, and Workshops. Wilmington, MA: Write Source, 1995. Print.  Princeton Review. Cracking the SAT.  Also used, a variety of board approved literature. 
     
    Units of Study: (1) Informative and Persuasive Research and Writing, (2) Writing, (3) Poetry, (4) Drama, (5) Debate, (6) Novel/Short Story

    Curriculum-Based Assessments: Unit Quizzes and Tests, Essays, Presentations/Projects, Midterm/Final Exams
     
    Standardized Assessments: PSAT (optional)
     
    Description of Course: In this sophomore year course, emphasis is placed on an analysis of spoken and written language with special emphasis on rhetorical devices and informative and persuasive speaking. Special focus on literary analysis and literary criticism will be included. Genres of literature to be evaluated include the novel, short story, poetry, and Shakespearean drama. Evidence-based research and inquiry skills will be evaluated in a variety of ways, including through a debate unit that focuses on current event topics. Writing emphasis will include informative, persuasive, descriptive, and resume writing as well as literary analysis, syntactically parallel paragraphs, timed writings, and research essays. Appropriate SAT vocabulary, including literary terms, will accompany units. Grammar and its basic usage will be analyzed and will be included as part of formal writing assignments and projects.

    English 10 differs from Honors English 10 in speed, scope, depth, and complexity of information covered throughout the school year.


     


    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: Honors English 10  Department: English & Language Arts

    Grade Level: 10  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes per day  Length of Course: Full year

    Primary Resources: O'Connor, J. Regis. Speech: Exploring Communications. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1988. Print.  Strunk, Wm., and E.B. White. The Elements of Style. New York: Pearson Longman, 2009. Print.  Sebranek, Patrick, and Dave Kemper. Writers Inc.: Sourcebook: Student Writing Guidelines, Models, and Workshops. Wilmington, MA: Write Source, 1995. Print.  Princeton Review. Cracking the SAT.  Also used, a variety of board approved literature.

    Units of Study: Informative and persuasive research and writing, writing, poetry, drama, debate and novel/short story.

    Curriculum-Based Assessments: (1) Informative and Persuasive Research and Writing, (2) Writing, (3) Poetry, (4) Drama, (5) Debate, (6) Novel/Short Story
     
    Standardized Assessments: PSAT (optional)

    Description: In this sophomore year course emphasis is placed on an analysis of spoken and written language with special emphasis on rhetorical devices and informative and persuasive speaking. Special focus on literary analysis and literary criticism will be included. Genres of literature to be evaluated include the novel, short story, poetry, and Shakespearean drama. Evidence-based research and inquiry skills will be evaluated in a variety of ways, including through a debate unit that focuses on current event topics. Writing emphasis will include informative, persuasive, descriptive, and resume writing as well as literary analysis, syntactically parallel paragraphs, timed writings, and research essays. Appropriate SAT vocabulary, including literary terms, will accompany units. Grammar and its basic usage will be analyzed and will be included as part of formal writing assignments and projects.

    Honors English 10 differs from English 10 in speed, scope, depth, and complexity of information covered throughout the school year.

     
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: Language Arts 10  Department: English & Language Arts

    Grade Level: 10  Time Per Day/Week: 84 minutes/day

    Length of Course: Year

    Primary Resources: Resources include-Green, Jane Fell. Language! 4th ed., Voyager Sopris, 2009.  O'Connor, J. Regis. Speech: Exploring Communications. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1988. Print.  Strunk, Wm., and E.B. White. The Elements of Style. New York: Pearson Longman, 2009. Print.  Sebranek, Patrick, and Dave Kemper. Writers Inc.: Sourcebook: Student Writing Guidelines, Models, and Workshops. Wilmington, MA: Write Source, 1995. Print.  Princeton Review. Cracking the SAT.  Also used, a variety of board approved literature.

    Units of Study:  Include informative and persuasive research and writing, writing, poetry, drama, debate, novel/short story as well as Language! Units 31-36

    Curriculum Based Assessments:  Include unit quizzes and tests, essays, presentations/projects, midterm/final exams.
     
    Standardized Assessments: Literature Keystone, CDT Benchmark Testing

    Description: Language Arts is a course that combines research-based literacy instruction with the English 10 curriculum.

    In this course, emphasis is placed on an analysis of spoken and written language as well as literary analysis and criticism of a variety of literature. Elements of literature evaluated include the novel, short story, poetry, and Shakespearean drama. Evidence-based research and inquiry skills will be evaluated. Writing emphasis will include informative, persuasive, descriptive, narrative, and resume writing as well as literary analysis/criticism, timed writings, research essays, and speeches. Appropriate SAT vocabulary, including literary terms, will accompany units. Grammar and its basic usage will be reviewed.
     
     


    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: English 11  Department: English & Language Arts

    Grade Level: 11  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes per day/every day  Length of Course: Year

    Primary Resources: Glencoe. Literature, The Reader’s Choice. Columbus, OH, McGraw-Hill, 2002.

    Units of Study: Units of study include Native American Literature, Literary Age of Puritanism, Literary Age of Reason, Literary Age of Enlightenment, Literary Depression/Civil Rights Era, and Formal Writing.

    Curriculum-Based Assessments: Section quizzes, Unit tests, individual and collaborative projects and formal writing assignments.

    Standardized Assessments: SAT, ACT
     
    Description: This course is a study of American literature and ages. Students are invited to study and experience the progression of thought as it begins with the Native Americans and progresses through the Revolutionary writers and the Romantic period. The literature study is of literary ages and genres. Reading, writing, speaking, and listening are reinforced through close study of the literature.The focus is on textual understanding, the progression of thought through the ages, understanding central ideas and determining what is explicitly stated, what is implied, and what is left uncertain. In addition, there is an emphasis on critical thinking and synthesis as well as historical, political and societal influences on the authors and their writings. The coursework requires students to think critically and support their ideas with specific evidence using a variety of modalities including projects and Socratic discussions. Essays and evidence-based research papers/projects are required writings, with emphasis placed on depth, development and analytical techniques. Appropriate SAT vocabulary and literary terms will accompany units.

     
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: Honors English 11  Department: English & Language Arts 
     
    Grade Level: 11  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes per day  Length of Course: Year

    Primary Resources: Probst, Robert E. Elements of Literature Fifth Course. Literature of the United States with Literature of the Americas. Austin: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1997. Print.  Also, use school board approved novels.

    Units of Study: 
    Native American, Colonial/Puritan, Age of Reason, Romanticism, Realism and Modernism, Postmodernism/Contemporary, Research Paper, Active Reading Strategies

    Curriculum-Based Assessments: Quizzes, unit tests, formal writing, informal writing, projects, presentations
     
    Standardized Assessments: N/A
     
    Description: This course is designed for the student who is proficient or advanced in all basic grammar, multi-paragraph writing and reading comprehension skills. This is an American literature course organized by a historical literary period with multiple genres: essays, articles, letters, journals, autobiography, drama, novels, short stories, and poetry. Both fiction and considerable non-fiction are included. Critical thinking and analysis improvement are emphasized through close study of historical and societal influences upon authors and texts; emphasis is also given to the structure of texts, including rhetorical appeals, literary devices, and vocabulary. Analytic, organized and critical writing skills are mastered through an inquiry-based, rigorous, historically relevant research paper, as well as multiple literary analysis essays anchored both in and among the literary periods. Several project-based learning opportunities exist throughout the year that integrates problem-solving, collaboration and presentation. Independence and internal motivation are key components, and skills in annotating, questioning, and responding to questions are practiced. National standardized testing (SAT and ACT) skills are embedded in daily learning goals and activities, and some isolated practice is included.
     

     
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: AP Language and Composition  Department: English & Language Arts
     
    Grade Level: 11th Grade  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes per day/every day  Length of Course: Year

    Primary Resources: School Board Approved Novels, Supplements from The Riverside Reader 6th Edition,  Supplements from AP Language and Composition 5 Steps to a 5 as well as AP Central College Board (website).

    Units of Study:  
    1. Composition: Narrative; Argument and Persuasion; Compare and Contrast; Process Analysis; Division and Classification; ACECON
    2. American Literature: Pre 19th Century: (“Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God;” Short Stories; Selected Essays and Speeches; The Scarlet Letter;  Post 19th Century: The Grapes of Wrath; The Great Gatsby; Of Mice and Men; The Catcher in the Rye; Fences; Ernest Hemingway
    3. AP Exam Prep


    Curriculum Based Assessments:  Section tests, Unit tests, Composition

    Standardized Assessments: AP Language and Composition Exam

    Description: Students in this introductory college-level course read and carefully analyze a broad and challenging range of fiction and nonfiction prose selections, deepening their awareness of rhetoric and the function of written and spoken language. Through close reading, frequent writing, as well as project-based and problem-based learning, students develop an ability to work with language and text with a greater awareness of purpose, strategy, and rhetorical tactics, while strengthening their own composing abilities. Course readings feature expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative texts from a variety of authors, formats, genres and historical contexts. Students examine and work with essays, letters, speeches, images, and imaginative literature. Required American Literature exposure will also be covered in accordance to Pine-Richland High School’s 11th grade curriculum. American Literature units run simultaneously with the AP Composition units in many instances. Summer reading and writing are required. Students prepare for the AP English Language and Composition Exam and may be granted advanced placement, college credit, or both as a result of satisfactory performance.



    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: Language Arts 11 and Language Arts 12   Department: English & Language Arts
     
    Grade Level: 11, 12  Time Per Day/Week: 84 minutes/day  Length of Course: Year
     
    Primary Resources:  Glencoe. Literature, The Reader’s Choice. Columbus, OH, McGraw-Hill, 2002.  McDougal Littell Literature. N.p.: Mifflin Harcourt, 2008. Print.  Also used board-approved novels, link to online resources and content-area textbooks.

    Units of Study:  American Literature, British Literature, individualized writing skills and practical reading for the content areas.

    Curriculum Based Assessments:  Quizzes, tests, individual and collaborative projects, class discussion, writing assignments

    Standardized Assessments: N/A

    Description: Language Arts 11/Language Arts 12 is an 84-minute class that builds upon the skills students learned in Language Arts 9 and Language Arts 10.

    Students will explore concepts from both English 11 and English 12 by reading a sampling of texts from American and British Literature. Students are taught specific comprehension and analysis skills as they read this literature and evaluate media and film portrayals of thematic concepts found in each text. Various activities, projects, and discussions provide students with differentiated ways to interact with these texts and to demonstrate their learning.

    Students in Language Arts 11/Language Arts 12 continue to develop writing skills with focused individualized writing instruction. Various essays and writing prompts are utilized throughout the year to build students’ capacity to write increasingly complex personal, argumentative, descriptive, and narrative essays.

    Students are also provided with group and individualized reading comprehension practice through the utilization of content-area and nonfiction texts.
     

     
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: English 12  Department: English & Language Arts
     
    Grade Level: 12  Time Per Day/Week: 42 Minutes/Every Day  Length of Course: 1 Year

    Primary Resources: McDougal Littell Literature. N.p.: Mifflin Harcourt, 2008. Print. Also use board-approved novels.

    Units of Study: Formal Writing (College Essay), Anglo-Saxon Literature, Medieval Literature, Renaissance Literature, Age of Reason Literature and Research Writing

    Curriculum-Based Assessments: Section Quizzes, Unit Tests, Individual & Collaborative Projects, Formal Writing Assignments, Essays, One-Pagers
     
    Standardized Assessments: N/A
     
    Description: This is a comprehensive course that revolves around the study of literary ages and the evolution of the
    English language, as well as social and cultural impacts on the literature. The literary units are focused upon ages of British literature. Reading, writing, speaking and listening are
    reinforced through close study of the literature. Evaluation of student work may include, but is not limited to section quizzes, unit tests, formal essays, individual and collaborative projects, one-pagers, homework, participation informally and through Socratic discussions, and a culminating final project. Course work will require students to analyze and evaluate information through course relevant research and related writing assignments. The college essay will be written as part of the first unit (formal writing). The units are studied in the following order: Formal Writing, Anglo-Saxon Literature, Medieval Literature, Renaissance Literature, and Age of Reason Literature. The course culminates with a reflective, final project stemming from reading of the nonfiction text, Last Lecture, by Randy Pausch. Grade 12 English is aligned to PA Academic and Core Standards.
     

     
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: Honors English 12  Department: English & Language Arts

    Grade Level: 12  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes/every day  Length of Course: Year

    Primary Resources: Literature (British Literature) McDougall-Littell. Evanston, Il 2008.
     
    Units of Study: (1) College/Formal Writing,  (2) Anglo-Saxon Literature, (3) Medieval Literature, (4) Renaissance Literature, (5) Research Writing, (6) Romantic Literature, (7) Twentieth-Century Literature

    Curriculum Based Assessments:  Essays, Group Project Presentations, Quizzes
     
    Standardized Assessments: N/A

    Description: Unit 1 focuses on how to the best approach to the college application essay.  The writing unit focuses on specific content, attention to audience, and grammar review.  The Standard Expository Paragraph (SEP) is also covered/reviewed. Unit 2 is about the British literature from ca. 450 to 1100 AD.  Beowulf is the main piece of literature.  Students study the times and the origins of the English language.  Unit 3 studies literature of the Middle Ages with some historical references.  The main piece of literature covered is The Canterbury Tales.  Unit 4 covers a Shakespearean tragedy and love poetry.  Students will write an expository essay on the tragedy. Unit 5 is mostly integrated throughout the year with attention on MLA formatting, successful researching, and a project or paper as an end- result.  Unit 6 covers literature during the early 1800s. Romantic poetry and the novel Frankenstein  is the concentration.  Finally, in Unit 7, the class reads selections from the modernist and post-modernist eras.  Various short works and a long work are covered (The Plague, The Birthday Party, Going After Caccicato are some options.) 


    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: AP Literature and Composition  Department: English & Language Arts

    Grade Level: 12  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes per day /every day  Length of Course: Year
     
    Primary Resources: Writing Essays about Literature (editon 7), Boston, MA, Thomson / Wadsworth, 2006.  The Norton Anthology of English Literature (sixth edition), New York, New York, Norton and Company, 1993.  Various teacher provided novels.
     
    Units of Study: College Essay, Anglo-Saxon Literature, Medieval Literature, Renaissance Literature, Restoration and 18th Century Literature, Romantic Literature, Victorian Literature, AP Preparation, Formal Writing

    Curriculum Based Assessments: Reading quizzes, unit tests, formal essays
     
    Standardized Assessments: AP Literature and Composition Test
     
    Description: This course is reserved for the exceptionally able student of literature and composition. The structure of the course is designed to duplicate that of a freshman college-level literature course with corresponding reading and writing expectations.. British literature is studied by literary periods and genres with a focus on following the progression of England as a nation through its literature. Critical thinking and analysis are emphasized as well as historical, political and societal influences on the authors and their writings. Essays and papers are critical in nature, with emphasis placed on depth, development and analytical techniques. In addition to British authors, select authors from world literature are used to reinforce thematic and ideological perspectives. Course work will require students to analyze and evaluate information through course relevant research and related writing assignments. Students will also be expected to write analytically about each of the readings that they will be doing for the course. General and technical vocabulary is based on College Board expectations.
     

     
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: Critical Reading Strategies  Department: English & Language Arts
     
    Grade Level: 9-12  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes per day/every day  Length of Course: Semester
     
    Primary Resources: Morris, Brenda D. Smith LeeAnn. Breaking Through. 9th ed. N.p.: Longman, 2009. Print.
     
    Units of Study: (1) Non-Fiction Text Strategies, (2) Study Skills, (3) Test-Taking Strategies

    Curriculum Based Assessments: Selection Quizzes and Unit Tests, Interactive Notebook, Final Exam
     
    Standardized Assessments: Literature Keystone Exam
     
    Description: This course is designed for students of all grades and academic levels who would like to improve their comprehension and analysis skills with nonfiction and fiction texts. There is an emphasis on nonfiction reading skills and study strategies that students will implement into their content areas. They will also learn time management and efficiency strategies, organization strategies, note-taking strategies, and test-taking skills. Students will also learn a variety of comprehension and analysis strategies for nonfiction and fiction text, including context clues, main idea and details, text organizational patterns, inference, author’s purpose, tone, and point of view. This course is perfect for students who wish to improve upon their critical reading skills and study strategies.
     

     
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: Principles of Acting  Department: English & Language Arts
     
    Grade Level: 9-12  Time Per Day/Week: 43 minutes/every day  Length of Course: Year

    Primary Resources: Various teacher provided texts

    Units of Study: Intro to the history of acting, stages, and the importance of observation, observation and critical thinking.  Also collaboration and creating sa afe environment to discover, intro to mechanics: voice, physical body, sense memory, emotion memory, and imagination, self awareness, objectives, and motivation, monologue, movement, improvisation and scenes, Shakespeare, method application and production.

    Curriculum Based Assessments: Section Quizzes, Unit Tests, Individual & Collaborative Project, Formal Writing Assignments, Essays, One-Pagers
     
    Standardized Assessments: N/A
     
    Description: This course, designed for both beginners or for those with training, introduces the process of acting, beginning with an investigation of the mechanicals and a study of self-awareness. The focus is on the acting process beginning with a more mechanical traditional approach and leading up to a study of Method acting. Students navigate through exercises via a variety of activities including improvisation, creative movement, skits, monologues, and scene work. Students learn to work together, self-reflect, and build confidence. Students are required to attend two productions, perform on stage and participate in the Shakespeare competition. These first year students are introduced to many aspects of stage production: acting, directing, writing, staging, propping, costuming, and setting. This first year program focuses primarily on acting. Students learn the basic acting theories ranging from the traditional approach to Method acting and apply those theories to their own monologue presentations. They learn to analyze and synthesize the physical, vocal, emotional, and intellectual aspects of a character. They acquire abilities and confidence to perform with conviction before an audience. In addition to acting skills and techniques, students are introduced to improvisational movement and theater terminology.
     

     
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: Principles of Directing  Department: English & Language Arts
     
    Grade Level: 10-12  Time Per Day/Week: 43 minutes/every day  Length of Course: Year

    Primary Resources: Various teacher provided texts

    Units of Study:  Movement in Directing; Method and Text Analysis review: connecting theory to directing process. Intro to Directing Process: Step 1: Script Selection. Leadership, Structure, and Concept of Directing. Concept, Stage Space, and Casting. Intro to Directing Process: Script Preparation. Technical Theater: The Foundation. Blocking & Creating Visual Interest. Rehearsal Process, Production Process, Problem Solving. Reflection: Director’s Book & Actor’s Journal. Theater v. Film Directing/Acting, Shakespeare. Main Stage Mini Performance

    Curriculum Based Assessments: Section Quizzes, Unit Tests, Individual & Collaborative Project, Formal Writing Assignments, Essays, One-Pagers
     
    Standardized Assessments: N/A

    Description: Principles of Directing continues to develop the acting skills and techniques learned in Principles of Acting course while investigating the art of directing. Students in this course are introduced to the basic principles of directing. They learn how to analyze and interpret a script from the director’s point of view. Students are introduced to the creative power of concept directing, auditioning and casting, creating prompt books, and staging a one-act production. Students learn to work together, self-reflect, and build confidence while collaborating to create a full stage production. Each student develops problem solving skills and on-the-spot decision making skills that cross over to the professional world.. Students navigate through exercises via a variety of activities including improvisation, creative movement, skits, monologues, and scene work. Students are required to attend two productions, perform on stage and participate in the Shakespeare competition. Students are required to attend two productions, perform on stage and participate in the Shakespeare competition.
     

      
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: Advanced Acting & Production  Department: English & Language Arts
     
    Grade Level: 10-12   Time Per Day/Week  42 Minutes/Every Day  Length of Course: Year
     
    Primary Resources: Various teacher-provided texts
     

    Units of Study: (1) Stanislavski Method to Acting & 8 Schools of Acting, (2) Principles of Acting Shakespeare, (3) Acting, Film, STage, Reader’s Theater, TV, Multimedia, (4) Main Stage: Script to Stage Steps, (5) Portfolio/Digital Reel/Vitae Creation, (6) Technical theater 2: Lighting, Sound, Costume, Makeup, Scenery, Prop, Vocabulary, (7) Improvisation & Acting, (8) House Management, Public Relations, (9) Professional networking, marketing, resources, (10) Movie Business v. Stage Business, (11) Commercial Acting

    Curriculum Based Assessments: Section Quizzes, Unit Tests, Individual & Collaborative Project, Formal Writing Assignments, Essays, One-Pagers
     
    Standardized Assessments: N/A
     
    Description of Course: This course is designed for students with a serious interest in advanced acting, directing, and production.  Serious study of the art and craft of the creative process are inherent in each day of study. Students consider human behavior and observation through the use of Stanislavski’s Method. Daily activities such as situational, character, and spontaneous improvisation are coupled with classic drama scenes to enhance their craft. Students engage in  the process of production in full. Student directors are required to select script, prepare a pitch, and a vision during the first few weeks of school. Students audition, prepare a character journal, actively participate in the rehearsal process and production meetings, and perform for the public. Students interested in technical theater and directing may be considered for assistant positions. Student attendance at professional productions of plays is a mandatory course requirement. Students navigate through exercises via a variety of activities including improvisation, creative movement, skits, monologues, and scene work.
     

     
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: Journalism 1  Department: English & Language Arts

    Grade Level: 9-12  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes every day  Length of Course: Year

    Primary Resources: Online newspapers, Microsoft Word
     
    Units of Study: The history of American Journalism, rights and responsibilities of Journalists, interviewing skills, the nature of news, techniques of newspaper writing, mechanics of newspaper production, layout design and notable Journalists.

    Curriculum Based Assessments: Unit quizzes, tests, weekly articles, projects, presentations
     
    Standardized Assessments: N/A

    Description: This course explores the principles of journalistic writing in order to produce the weekly high school newspaper: the RAMPAGE. Students adhere to a strict weekly schedule in order to guarantee the paper is available for the entire Pine-Richland School District online. Hard copies are available for the high school. Students are expected to master interviewing and concise writing skills by reading a wide variety of newspapers including local (print) papers, online papers, school papers, and monthly publications. Units of study include: the history of American journalism, rights and responsibilities of journalists, interviewing skills, the nature of news, techniques of newspaper writing, mechanics of newspaper production, layout design, and notable journalists throughout the past four decades. Students define, identify, analyze and write: hard news, features, sports, opinion, local, world, and entertainment. Copy editing skills are developed through editing activities and proofreading. Students are expected to constantly reflect upon what it means to be a Journalist in the truest sense of the word by engaging in authentic writing experiences.



    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: Journalism 2  Department: English & Language Arts

    Grade Level: 10-12  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes every day  Length of Course: Year

    Primary Resources: The school newspaper, the Rampage; Online newspapers; Microsoft Word

    Units of Study: (1) The history of American Journalism; (2) Rights and responsibilities of Journalists; (3) Interviewing skills; (4) The nature of news; (5) Techniques of newspaper writing; (6) Mechanics of newspaper production; (7) Layout design; (8) Notable Journalists
     
    Curriculum-Based Assessments: Unit quizzes, tests, weekly articles, projects, presentations, response essays
     
    Standardized Assessments: N/A

    Description: This course explores the principles of journalistic writing in order to produce the weekly high school newspaper: the RAMPAGE. Students adhere to a strict weekly schedule in order to guarantee the paper is available for the entire Pine-Richland School District online. Hard copies are available for the high school. Students are expected to master interviewing and concise writing skills by reading a wide variety of newspapers including local (print) papers, online papers, school papers, and monthly publications. Units of study include: the history of American journalism, rights and responsibilities of journalists, interviewing skills, the nature of news, techniques of newspaper writing, mechanics of newspaper production, layout design, and notable journalists throughout the past four decades. Students define, identify, analyze and write: hard news, features, sports, opinion, local, world, and entertainment. Copy editing skills are developed through editing activities and proofreading. Students are expected to constantly reflect upon what it means to be a Journalist in the truest sense of the word by engaging in authentic writing experiences.
     


    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: Yearbook 1  Department: English & Language Arts
     
    Grade Level: 9-12  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes/every day  Length of Course: Year

    Primary Resources: Walsworth Online Design
     
    Units of Study: (1) Production of Yearbook, (2) Parts of the Yearbook, (3) Legal Responsibilities, (4) Fields, Folders, Fonts, (5) Online Design, (6) Master Pages, (7) Submitting and Indexing, (8) Visual Storytelling, (9) Stories and Ideas, (10) Interviewing, (11) Writing, (12) Photographic Composition, (13) Digital Camera, (14) Marketing, (15) Advertising, (16) Leadership, (17) Brainstorming, (18) Theme, (19) Coverage, (20) Book Organization

    Curriculum-Based Assessments: Unit quizzes and tests and spread creation
     
    Standardized Assessments: N/A
     
    Description: Students in Yearbook I create the Pine-Richland High School Rambler Yearbook. The book operates on a strict publishing deadline schedule each month to ensure the Yearbook is distributed each May. This course requires students to dedicate after school time to take pictures, interview, and attend school-related events. Students will also be responsible for marketing the sale of the book and selling senior advertisements too. At the start of the year, students will manage the distribution of the spring supplement yearbook. In the fall, students will facilitate the annual club photo day. In the spring, students will host the annual Yearbook distribution day during all lunches. Areas of focus include Production of Yearbook, Parts of the Yearbook, Legal Responsibilities, Fields, Folders, Fonts, Online Design, Master Pages, Submitting and Indexing, Visual Storytelling, Stories and Ideas, Interviewing, Writing & Editing, Photographic Composition, Digital Camera, Marketing, Advertising, Leadership, Brainstorming, Theme, Coverage, and Book Organization.
     


    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: Yearbook 2  Department: English & Language Arts

    Grade Level: 9-12  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes every day  Length of Course: Year

    Primary Resources: 
    Walsworth Online Design
     
    Units of Study: (1) Production of Yearbook, (2) Parts of the Yearbook, (3) Legal Responsibilities, (4) Fields, Folders, Fonts, (5) Online Design, (6) Master Pages, (7) Submitting and Indexing, (8) Visual Storytelling, (9) Stories and Ideas, (10) Interviewing, (11) Writing, (12) Photographic Composition, (13) Digital Camera, (14) Marketing, (15) Advertising, (16) Leadership, (17) Brainstorming, (18) Theme, (19) Coverage, (20) Book Organization
     
    Curriculum-Based Assessments: Unit quizzes and tests and spread creation

    Standardized Assessments:  N/A 

    Description: Students in Yearbook 2 create the Pine-Richland High School Rambler Yearbook. The book operates on a strict publishing deadline schedule each month to ensure the Yearbook is distributed each May. This course requires students to dedicate after school time to take pictures, interview, and attend school-related events. Students will also be responsible for marketing the sale of the book and selling senior advertisements too. At the start of the year, students will manage the distribution of the spring supplement yearbook. In the fall, students will facilitate the annual club photo day. In the spring, students will host the annual Yearbook distribution day during all lunches. Areas of focus include Production of Yearbook, Parts of the Yearbook, Legal Responsibilities, Fields, Folders, Fonts, Online Design, Master Pages, Submitting and Indexing, Visual Storytelling, Stories and Ideas, Interviewing, Writing & Editing, Photographic Composition, Digital Camera, Marketing, Advertising, Leadership, Brainstorming, Theme, Coverage, and Book Organization.
     


    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: Yearbook 3  Department: English & Language Arts

    Grade Level: 11-12  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes every day  Length of Course: Year

    Primary Resources: Walsworth Online Design

    Units of Study: (1) Production of Yearbook, (2) Parts of the Yearbook, (3) Legal Responsibilities, (4) Fields, Folders, Fonts, (5) Online Design, (6) Master Pages, (7) Submitting and Indexing, (8) Visual Storytelling, (9) Stories and Ideas, (10) Interviewing, (11) Writing, (12) Photographic Composition, (13) Digital Camera, (14) Marketing, (15) Advertising, (16) Leadership, (17) Brainstorming, (18) Theme, (19) Coverage, (20) Book Organization
     
    Curriculum-Based Assessments: Unit quizzes and tests and spread creation
     
    Standardized Assessments: N/A
     
    Description: Students in Yearbook create the Pine-Richland High School Rambler Yearbook. The book operates on a strict publishing deadline schedule each month to ensure the Yearbook is distributed each May. This course requires students to dedicate after school time to take pictures, interview, and attend school-related events. Students will also be responsible for marketing the sale of the book and selling senior advertisements too. At the start of the year, students will manage the distribution of the spring supplement yearbook. In the fall, students will facilitate the annual club photo day. In the spring, students will host the annual Yearbook distribution day during all lunches. Areas of focus include Production of Yearbook, Parts of the Yearbook, Legal Responsibilities, Fields, Folders, Fonts, Online Design, Master Pages, Submitting and Indexing, Visual Storytelling, Stories and Ideas, Interviewing, Writing & Editing, Photographic Composition, Digital Camera, Marketing, Advertising, Leadership, Brainstorming, Theme, Coverage, and Book Organization.

     
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: Yearbook 4  Department: English & Language Arts

    Grade Level: 12  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes every day  Length of Course: Year

    Primary Resources: Walsworth Online Design

    Units of Study: (1) Production of Yearbook, (2) Parts of the Yearbook, (3) Legal Responsibilities, (4) Fields, Folders, Fonts, (5) Online Design, (6) Master Pages, (7) Submitting and Indexing, (8) Visual Storytelling, (9) Stories and Ideas, (10) Interviewing, (11) Writing, (12) Photographic Composition, (13) Digital Camera, (14) Marketing, (15) Advertising, (16) Leadership, (17) Brainstorming, (18) Theme, (19) Coverage, (20) Book Organization
     
    Curriculum-Based Assessments: Unit quizzes and tests and spread creation, response essays, presentations
     
    Standardized Assessments: N/A
     
    Description: Students in Yearbook 4 create the Pine-Richland High School Rambler Yearbook. The book operates on a strict publishing deadline schedule each month to ensure the Yearbook is distributed each May. This course requires students to dedicate after school time to take pictures, interview, and attend school-related events. Students will also be responsible for marketing the sale of the book and selling senior advertisements. At the start of the year, students will manage the distribution of the spring supplement portion of the yearbook. In the fall, students will facilitate the annual club photo day. In the spring, students will host the annual Yearbook distribution day during all lunches. Areas of focus include Production of Yearbook, Parts of the Yearbook, Legal Responsibilities, Fields, Folders, Fonts, Online Design, Master Pages, Submitting and Indexing, Visual Storytelling, Stories and Ideas, Interviewing, Writing & Editing, Photographic Composition, Digital Camera, Marketing, Advertising, Leadership, Brainstorming, Theme, Coverage, and Book Organization.
     

     
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: College in High School - Argument  Department: English & Language Arts
     
    Grade Level: 11, 12  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes per day/every day  Length of Course: Year

    Primary Resources: Teacher Provided Unit Packets (handouts, samples, worksheets)

    Units of Study: Argument vs. Rhetoric, Aristotle, Logical Fallacies, Debate, Student Congress

    Curriculum Based Assessments: Presentations, debates, essays

    Standardized Assessments:  N/A

    Description: This introductory course, which is offered as an English elective, examines the fundamentals of argument and promotes proficiency in the application of elementary debating techniques. It is taught as part of the University of Pittsburgh’s overall College in High School program. Successful completion of the program will result in guaranteed college credit at the University of Pittsburgh and other universities and colleges that accept the course for those who pay a course fee. Paying the course fee is optional for all students who take the class. CHS Argument explores the foundations of argument construction, support, and refutation, and it begins with a review of Aristotle’s work on rhetoric. It also develops argument skills through a variety of formal and informal in-class activities. The course includes an analysis of argument in the public forum and focuses on a number of current event topics. There is a written as well as oral component to this course.
     


     
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
     
    Course Title: Creative Writing  Department: English & Language Arts

    Grade Level: 11-12  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes per day/5 days per week  Length of Course: Year

    Primary Resources: N/A

    Units of Study: (1) Poetry; (2) Nonfiction/Memoir; (3) Short Fiction; (4) Drama

    Curriculum-Based Assessments: Portfolio additions from every unit: Poetry, Nonfiction/Memoir, Short Fiction, Short Drama

    Standardized Assessments: N/A

    Description: Unit 1 focuses on the structure and creative options for writing multiple forms of poetry.  Students read a selection of professionally published poems, learn the terminology, and write and revise 4 to 7 different poems including, but not necessarily limited to a haiku, recursive poem, seasonal poem, sonnet, and personal poem.  Unit 2 focuses on the definition and construct of creative nonfiction and/or memoir, as well as peer feedback leading to revision. Students will read professional examples of creative nonfiction/memoir. Unit 3 will delve into short fiction.  After reading multiple examples of short short fiction, students will try their hand at writing, giving feedback, and revising a short story.  Finally, in Unit 4, students will read and watch examples of one-act plays, undergo various writing dramatic exercises, and then compose a one-act play.  An essential part of Creative Writing is the Writing Workshop where students read and analyze the work of a fellow student.