• 9-12th Grade Curriculum

     
     
     
     
     
     



    Family & Consumer Sciences Course Title: 
    Contemporary Living  Department: Family and Consumer Sciences

     
    Grade Level - 9-12  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes/5 days a week  Length of Course: Semester
     

    Primary Resources: Parnell, Frances Baynor Skills for Living. Illinois. Goodheart-Wilcox, 2008. Print

     
    Units of Study: (1) Communication, (2) Relationships, (3) Family, (4) Parenting, (5) Interior Design, (6) Textiles, (7) Fashion and Apparel, (8) Kitchen Basics, (9) Menu Planning, (10) Healthy Eating
     
    Curriculum-Based Assessments: Project-based curriculum
     
    Standardized Assessments: N/A
     
    Description: Contemporary Living is designed as a project-based course that encourages students to express their creativity while gaining real-life experience in design as it relates to Family and Consumer Science topics. Students are encouraged to prepare for life on their own as they discover how to design and choose furnishings for their first apartment or dorm room and prepare budget-friendly, healthy meals using simple, basic appliances such as a panini maker. Exploration of relationships between partners, communication skills, family dynamics, and the reality of raising children are also key topics. Fashion and the design process are put to the test after students complete personality testing and then design and create projects using basic machine sewing techniques. This course will help prepare students with life survival skills beyond high school.

     


     

    Family & Consumer Sciences
     

    Course Title: Independent Living  Department: Family and Consumer Sciences

     
    Grade Level: 9-12  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes / 5 days a week  Length of Course: Semester
     

    Primary Resources: Parnell, Frances Baynor, Joyce Honeycutt. Wooten, and Frances Baynor. Parnell. Skills for living. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox, 2008. Print.

     
    Units of Study: (1) Goals, (2) Careers, (3) Budgets and Banking, (4) Nutrition and Nutrients
     
    Curriculum-Based Assessments: Projects, performance-based assessments (lab work), unit quizzes, pre and post tests
     
    Standardized Assessments: N/A
     
    Description: This project-based course is designed to prepare high school students to become more independent now and in the future. Students will have the opportunity to modify projects based on their own interests and life goals. Real-life simulation is used to expose students to the realities of managing money, becoming a smart consumer, and entering the world of work. Nutrition, healthy food choices, and recipe modification are put into practice in the foods laboratory where students will improve their skills in the kitchen in order to feed themselves and their current and future families.  This is a course that all college freshmen and young adults living on their own for the first time wish that they would have taken while they were in high school. This course is aligned with Pennsylvania State Standards and follows a project/performance-based curriculum.


    Child Development Course Title: Child Development and Parenting I  Department: Family and Consumer Sciences
     
    Grade Level: 10-12  Time Per Day/Week: 1 period/5 day week  Length of Course: Semester
     
    Primary Resources: Brisbane, Holly E. The Developing Child. New York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 2006. Print.
     
    Units of Study: Why Study Child Development, Infant Development, Toddler Development, Preschooler Development, Preschool Laboratory
     
    Curriculum Based Assessments: Unit based tests and quizzes, unit projects and presentations, written observations
     
    Standardized Assessments: N/A

    Description of Course: This experiential course studies engages students in the theories of physical, social, emotional, and intellectual development of children birth through age six during the first nine weeks. Theories from Sigmund Freud, Arnold Gesell, Erik Erikson, and Marie Montessori are focused upon . Students gain real-life experience developing and using effective communication, time-management skills and problem-solving techniques while participating in the Preschool Laboratory during second quarter. In the Preschool laboratory students apply developmentally appropriate practice planning, preparing and implementing learning activities, story, music, and movement activities. Food and nutrition guidelines are followed as students plan and prepare healthy snacks for the preschool children. Upon successful completion of Child Development and Parenting I, students enroll in Child Development and Parenting II.
     

    Child Development

     

    Course Title: Child Development and Parenting II  Department: Family and Consumer Sciences

     
    Grade Level: 10-12  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes/5 days per week  Length of Course: Semester
     

    Primary Resources: Brisbane, Holly E. The Developing Child. New York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 2006. Print.

     
    Units of Study: (1) Prenatal Development, (2) Pregnancy, (3) Real Care Baby Parenting Experience, (4) Preschool Laboratory, (5) Teen Pregnancy, and (6) Parenting
     
    Curriculum-Based Assessments: Unit-based tests and quizzes, unit projects and presentations, written observations
     

    Standardized Assessments: N/A

     
    Description: In a continuation of Child Development and Parenting I, students expand their knowledge and explore the effects of heredity and environmental influences on the prenatal development of children and apply the theories and research of Piaget, Montessori, and Erikson while exploring the stages of preschool development. Time management and emotional challenges of parenting along with the health and safety of children are explored through the Real Care Baby II

    Experiential Parenting Simulation project. In a mutually beneficial situation, this course offers an extended experience in the Preschool Laboratory, increasing the number of weeks spent in interaction with the children, planning developmentally appropriate activities and lessons in English Language Arts, Math, science, art, music, and movement following the Pennsylvania Early Childhood Standards. Career opportunities and child care options are also investigated.

     



    Family & Consumer Sciences

    Course Title: Food Explorations  Department: Family and Consumer Sciences
     
    Grade Level: 10-12  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes per day / 5 days a week  Length of Course: Semester
     
    Primary Resources: Largen, Velda L. Guide to good food. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company, Inc., 2000. Print.
     
    Units of Study: (1) Introduction to the Kitchen; (2) Meal Planning (breakfast, dinner, holiday meals); (3) Food Safety; (4) Soups, Stocks, and Sauces (cream and tomato based); (5) Working with Leavening Agents
     
    Curriculum-Based Assessments: Projects, Performance-based assessments (lab work)
     
    Standardized Assessments: N/A
     

    Description: Food Explorations is a course designed to explore the basic food groups and the psychology behind food choices while teaching the safety and sanitation skills needed in food preparation. Students take the initiative and learn to plan, prepare, and consume foods that are completely new and exciting and that are prepared from start to finish without using processed foods. This course provides a comprehensive education in the areas of meal planning and preparation and defines the need for students to maximize resources when planning, preparing and serving food and expand their role in healthy eating to ensure good health in the future. Keeping health in mind, students will learn how to prepare their favorite convenience foods without the added sodium and preservatives. While working in teams, students gain the essential skills to ensure success in future careers. Communication, organization, conservation, group cooperation and money management skills are incorporated into the weekly foods labs. This course is aligned with Pennsylvania State Standards and follows a project/performance-based curriculum.
     



    Family & Consumer Sciences
     
    Course Title: Global Cuisine  Department: Family and Consumer Sciences

    Grade Level: 
    10-12  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes per day / 5 days a week  Length of Course: Semester
     
    Primary Resources:  Largen, Velda L. Guide to good food. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company, Inc., 2000. Print.
     
    Units of Study: (1) The United States (South, Mid-Atlantic, New England, Midwest, Southwest, Pacific Coast, Hawaii); (2) France; (3) Great Britain; (4) China; & (5) Italy
     
    Curriculum-Based Assessments: Unit tests, performance-based assessments (lab work), Final Exam
     
    Standardized Assessments: N/A

    Description: In Global Cuisine, students will enjoy making a Chicago-style pizza, Jambalaya or a dinner straight from Europe. This course offers foods representing the melting pot of American cuisine and foods from all over the world. Students use historical and cultural influences that have contributed to regional food specialties and mimic their dishes here in the kitchen labs of Pine-Richland. The course allows students to explore selected ethnic foods in weekly labs as well as share customs of their own individualized heritage. When studying regions, students consider factors such as geography, climate, and culture that show influence on food selection and preparation, and utilize food safety and sanitation to ensure a safe product. Learn culture through taste in Global Cuisine. Teamwork, communication, organization, and conservation skills are integrated into the class as students read and follow directions, work together to complete each task, and make healthy substitutions whenever available. This course is aligned with Pennsylvania State Standards and follows a project/performance-based curriculum.



    Family & Consumer Sciences
     
    Course Title:  The Science of Baking  Department: Family and Consumer Sciences
     
    Grade Level: 10-12  Time Per Day/Week: 42 minutes / 5 days a week  Length of Course: Semester

    Primary Resources: Largen, Velda L. Guide to good food. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company, Inc., 2000. Print.
     
    Units of Study: (1) Introduction to the Kitchen, (2) Function of Ingredients, (3) Breads, (4) Pastry, (5) Cookies, (6) Cakes
     
    Curriculum-Based Assessments: Unit tests, performance-based assessments (lab work), final exam
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    Standardized Assessments: N/A 

    Description: In this course, students learn the fundamentals and the science involved in the making of quick breads, yeast breads, pastries, cakes, and cookies. Students learn the lost art of baking from scratch which is great on a budget and limits preservatives and additives. Emphasis on equipment, the function of ingredients, avoiding convenience products when possible, the importance of accurate measurements and baking terminology gives students the skills to ensure their success in the kitchen. The knowledge of ingredients and how those ingredients react when combined is an integral part of baking and will be used throughout each lab. Teamwork, communication, organization, and conservation skills are integrated into the class as students read and follow directions, work together to complete each task, and make healthy substitutions whenever available. This course is aligned with Pennsylvania State Standards and follows a project/performance-based curriculum.